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Parental Stress, Care Demands, and Use of Support Services for School-Age Children with Disabilities and Behavior Problems

Frank J. Floyd and Erin M. Gallagher
Family Relations
Vol. 46, No. 4, Family Caregiving for Persons with Disabilities (Oct., 1997), pp. 359-371
DOI: 10.2307/585096
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/585096
Page Count: 13
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Parental Stress, Care Demands, and Use of Support Services for School-Age Children with Disabilities and Behavior Problems
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Abstract

Data were obtained from mothers and fathers of children (N = 231) with mental retardation (MR) or chronic illness (CI), and a nondisabled behavior-problems sample. Mothers identified fewer behavior problems in children with MR and more in children with CI than did teachers. The presence of significant behavior problems was more important than disability type in determining most forms of parental stress, and predicted mental health services use. MR group parents worried most about providing ongoing care into adulthood. Single mothers were not more stressed, but used more services than two-parent families. The results call for a wider array of community and family support services that target children with disabilities who have behavior problems.

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