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Sex Differences in Motivations and Effects in Dating Violence

Diane R. Follingstad, Shannon Wright, Shirley Lloyd and Jeri A. Sebastian
Family Relations
Vol. 40, No. 1 (Jan., 1991), pp. 51-57
DOI: 10.2307/585658
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/585658
Page Count: 7
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Sex Differences in Motivations and Effects in Dating Violence
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Abstract

Sex differences in motivations for and effects of dating violence are investigated using perceptions of both victims and perpetrators. A total of 495 college students (207 males and 288 females) completed a measure assessing motivation for and effects of dating violence, along with a social desirability measure, a state-trait anger expression inventory, a justification of relationship violence measure, and the Conflict Tactics Scale. Sex differences were evident in numerous motivations for and effects of dating violence and were also influenced by level of violence. Females were less likely to think force could be justifiable. Implications for the specific findings are discussed.

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