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Adult Children with Frail Elderly Parents: When to Intervene?

Robert O. Hansson, R. Eric Nelson, Margaret D. Carver, David H. NeeSmith, Elsie M. Dowling, Wesla L. Fletcher and Peter Suhr
Family Relations
Vol. 39, No. 2 (Apr., 1990), pp. 153-158
DOI: 10.2307/585717
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/585717
Page Count: 6
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Adult Children with Frail Elderly Parents: When to Intervene?
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Abstract

Two studies (involving 242 adult children and 66 elderly parents) explored factors predicting the likelihood, timing, and nature of intervention in caregiving or decision-making for older parents. Results indicated that a large majority of adult children (71%) would at some point intervene, but that such interventions normally follow a supportive and conservative profile. Consciousness of aging issues and family involvement in caregiving were related to parent's health status, as well as to perceptions of vulnerability associated with parent's psychological adjustment, personality, and support resources (although these variables shared considerable variance). Implications for family practitioners are outlined.

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