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Interparental Agreement, Parent-Child Responsiveness, and Children's Peer Competence

Eric W. Lindsey and Jacquelyn Mize
Family Relations
Vol. 50, No. 4 (Oct., 2001), pp. 348-354
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/585793
Page Count: 7
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Interparental Agreement, Parent-Child Responsiveness, and Children's Peer Competence
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Abstract

This study examined associations between interparental agreement, parent-child responsiveness, and children's social competence with peers. Assessments of interparental agreement among 33 parenting dyads were based on (a) parental agreement on beliefs about the use of control in childrearing, and (b) parental similarity in the use of initiations during play with child. Parent-child responsiveness was assessed by subjective ratings of parent-child play interaction. Teachers and peers provided assessments of children's social competence. Associations were found between parental agreement in beliefs about control and parental similarity in the use of control with child. Parental agreement on beliefs about the use of control and parental similarity in the use of control were both positively associated with children's social competence. Parent-child responsiveness also was positively associated with children's social competence. Associations between agreement measures and children's social competence were partially mediated by parent-child responsiveness. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

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