Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Ethnic Variation in the Female Labour Force: A Research Note

Pamela Abbott and Melissa Tyler
The British Journal of Sociology
Vol. 46, No. 2 (Jun., 1995), pp. 339-353
DOI: 10.2307/591792
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/591792
Page Count: 15
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Ethnic Variation in the Female Labour Force: A Research Note
Preview not available

Abstract

The 1991 Census question on ethnic origin makes it possible to analyse occupational segregation by gender and ethnic group in a way which has not been feasible before. The analysis shows that Black Caribbean and African women are more likely to be economically active than white ones (i.e. employed or seeking employment). It confirms that all non-white women are more likely than white ones to be unemployed or on a government scheme. However, it reveals considerable variation between ethnic groups and does not confirm any tendency for non-white women to be segregated uniformly in the 'lower' employment grades. Indeed, Pakistani and Chinese women are notably over-represented in the managerial and professional grades, and more Chinese women than Chinese men are employed professionals and managers or owners of small businesses.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[339]
    [339]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
340
    340
  • Thumbnail: Page 
341
    341
  • Thumbnail: Page 
342
    342
  • Thumbnail: Page 
343
    343
  • Thumbnail: Page 
344
    344
  • Thumbnail: Page 
345
    345
  • Thumbnail: Page 
346
    346
  • Thumbnail: Page 
347
    347
  • Thumbnail: Page 
348
    348
  • Thumbnail: Page 
349
    349
  • Thumbnail: Page 
350
    350
  • Thumbnail: Page 
351
    351
  • Thumbnail: Page 
352
    352
  • Thumbnail: Page 
353
    353