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"Arabs" in Babylonia in the 8th Century B. C.

I. Ephʿal
Journal of the American Oriental Society
Vol. 94, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1974), pp. 108-115
DOI: 10.2307/599734
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/599734
Page Count: 8
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"Arabs" in Babylonia in the 8th Century B. C.
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Abstract

Names of tribes, settlements, and chieftains of people called Aramaeans in Neo-Assyrian royal inscriptions have been regarded for a long time as proof for the existence of Arabs in Babylonia. A new investigation of the evidence shows that practically none of the names so far regarded as Arabic is in fact Arabic. However, the report of Sennacherib's campaign against the Chaldeans contains a list of toponyms which can be connected linguistically with the names of Arab chieftains in the inscriptions of Assurbanipal. This suggests that one has to reckon with an Arab penetration in Babylonia at least some decades before Sennacherib's first campaign. The main area of this penetration is restricted to the territory of Bīt Dakkuri and Bīt Amukani.

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