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Artaxerxes, Ardašīr, and Bahman

Saïd Amir Arjomand
Journal of the American Oriental Society
Vol. 118, No. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 1998), pp. 245-248
DOI: 10.2307/605896
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/605896
Page Count: 4
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Artaxerxes, Ardašīr, and Bahman
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Abstract

Islamic sources and "ninth-century" Pahlavi books firmly link Ardašīr, the founder of the Sasanian empire, to the legendary late Kayanid king, Bahman. This connection was a central element in the Sasanian revolutionary ideology that included the revival of Zoroastrianism. I propose that Artaxerxes II, to demonstrate his dedication to Zoroastrianism and to Vohu Manah, assumed the epithet Vahuman (Greek Μνήμων). Six centuries later, championing Zoroastrianism, Ardašīr harked back to the memory of Artaxerxes under that theophoric epithet.

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