Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Modern Persian Verb Stems Revisited

Michael M. T. Henderson
Journal of the American Oriental Society
Vol. 114, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1994), pp. 639-641
DOI: 10.2307/606170
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/606170
Page Count: 3
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Modern Persian Verb Stems Revisited
Preview not available

Abstract

Modern Persian verb stems fall into five classes according to their form in present and past inflections: (1) invariant (both stems the same); (2) consonantal alternations, in which the present stem ends in a different consonant from the past stem; (3) vocalic alternations; (4) augmentative, in which the past stem is a syllable longer than the present stem; and (5) suppletive. The relatively new descriptive model known as Lexical Phonology allows the principled collapse of these five classes into two: (1) those whose past stems are predictable by rule from their present stems; and (2) those which, however regular or irregular in appearance their alternations, must clearly be learned one at a time by children acquiring Persian.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
639
    639
  • Thumbnail: Page 
640
    640
  • Thumbnail: Page 
641
    641