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Modern Persian Verb Stems Revisited

Michael M. T. Henderson
Journal of the American Oriental Society
Vol. 114, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1994), pp. 639-641
DOI: 10.2307/606170
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/606170
Page Count: 3
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Modern Persian Verb Stems Revisited
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Abstract

Modern Persian verb stems fall into five classes according to their form in present and past inflections: (1) invariant (both stems the same); (2) consonantal alternations, in which the present stem ends in a different consonant from the past stem; (3) vocalic alternations; (4) augmentative, in which the past stem is a syllable longer than the present stem; and (5) suppletive. The relatively new descriptive model known as Lexical Phonology allows the principled collapse of these five classes into two: (1) those whose past stems are predictable by rule from their present stems; and (2) those which, however regular or irregular in appearance their alternations, must clearly be learned one at a time by children acquiring Persian.

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