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Chaste and Filial Women in Chinese Historical Writings of the Eleventh Century

Richard L. Davis
Journal of the American Oriental Society
Vol. 121, No. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 2001), pp. 204-218
DOI: 10.2307/606561
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/606561
Page Count: 15
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Chaste and Filial Women in Chinese Historical Writings of the Eleventh Century
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Abstract

In the eleventh century, Chinese historians made significant advances in their craft. They also promoted certain moral views that differed from those of their predecessors. In particular, they seem to have adopted a distinctive perspective on women. This is most apparent when one compares the accounts of "Notable Women" included in the Xin Tang shu with those written for a similar chapter of the Jiu Tang shu a century previously. The present paper takes some of these accounts as a point of departure for an examination of this issue, its background, and related matters, giving special focus to the work of Ouyang Xiu.

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