Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Development and Stability of Positional Information in Xenopus Retinal Ganglion Cells

R. K. Hunt and Marcus Jacobson
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 69, No. 4 (Apr., 1972), pp. 780-783
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/61701
Page Count: 4
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Development and Stability of Positional Information in Xenopus Retinal Ganglion Cells
Preview not available

Abstract

Neuronal specificity in retinal ganglion cells of Xenopus subserves the orderly connections of the optic nerve fibers in the tectum. This specificity derives from positional information acquired by the developing retina at embryonic stages 28-31. Here we report that ganglion cells of embryonic stage 28 eyes can acquire positional information with reference to the major axes of the body not only in the ocular orbit but also at other positions on the side of the body. When returned to the orbit this eye will form appropriate retinotectal connections. Conversely, retinal ganglion cells of stage 31 eyes, which have acquired positional information in the orbit, will retain their original neuronal positional specificities if the formation of retinotectal connections is delayed by grafting the eye to the flank for 30 days before returning it to the orbit. We conclude that neuronal specificity of retinal ganglion cells (a) does not derive from ``inducers'' unique to the periocular tissues; and (b) persists for some time independently of the establishment of retinotectal connections.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
780
    780
  • Thumbnail: Page 
781
    781
  • Thumbnail: Page 
782
    782
  • Thumbnail: Page 
783
    783