Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Landownership and Urban Growth in Bradford and Its Environs in the West Riding Conurbation, 1850-1950

M. J. Mortimore
Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers
No. 46 (Mar., 1969), pp. 105-119
DOI: 10.2307/621411
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/621411
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Landownership and Urban Growth in Bradford and Its Environs in the West Riding Conurbation, 1850-1950
Preview not available

Abstract

The tithe maps and the first edition of the Ordnance Survey Six-Inch Map provide a detailed picture of landownership and settlement in Bradford and its environs shortly before 1850. The subsequent rapid extension of the built-up area was closely influenced in plan by the antecedent pattern of landownership, an influence which has been found in other towns. Large estates were subject to special conditions which often prevented their use for building, giving rise to many of the undeveloped areas in the conurbation today. Smallholdings were far more numerous, freely available, and well suited to the small average size of unit in the building industry. Early development favoured areas of smallholdings, whereas municipal housing estates have tended to search out surviving large estates. Freehold tenure, an ancient feature of the district, influenced the structure of the building industry and may have been responsible for the adoption of the back-to-back style in working-class housing.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119