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Jointing, Aspect and the Orientation of Scarp-Face Dry Valleys, near Ivinghoe, Buckinghamshire

E. H. Brown
Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers
No. 48 (Dec., 1969), pp. 61-73
DOI: 10.2307/621491
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/621491
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Jointing, Aspect and the Orientation of Scarp-Face Dry Valleys, near Ivinghoe, Buckinghamshire
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Abstract

The relationships between the orientations of scarp-face dry valleys, elements in the geological structure (particularly joints) and the aspect of the scarp are examined in respect of the Chiltern escarpment at Ivinghoe. Both joints and dry valleys show preferred orientations which are unlikely to be the result of chance but there is only a very weak correlation between preferred joint and preferred dry-valley directions. Even the most deeply incised valleys cannot be related to the joint pattern in any convincing way. The only relationship detected is between the orientations of the regional strike and dip and those of a few valleys or segments of valleys, including parts of the most deeply incised ones. It appears that, in this area, joints do not determine dry-valley orientations but that in some instances strike faults may do so. The evidence does not support an hypothesis of spring sapping for the origin of the valleys. There is a marked tendency for the dry valleys to run either near-normally down the scarp or obliquely from right to left as the scarp is viewed from below. Linear erosion, probably by niveo-fluvial processes and largely controlled in direction by the slope of the scarp face, is a possible mode of origin for those valleys trending normal to the scarp. The obliquely trending valleys may have been inherited from an earlier valley system.

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