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A Method to Determine Shingle Supply to the Coast

Roger S. Crofts
Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers
No. 62 (Jul., 1974), pp. 115-127
DOI: 10.2307/621518
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/621518
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Method to Determine Shingle Supply to the Coast
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Abstract

Relict coastal landforms in Montrose Bay are dominated by shingle particles, which are thought to be derived mainly from inland sources. Standard sediment size and shape parameters and lithology and surface textures of sedimentary particles were used to test this hypothesis. Samples from potential sources of supply to the coast were compared with the properties of relict coastal shingle using bivariate scattergrams. The inland shingle was readily distinguishable from the littoral source types. The relict coastal shingle closely resembled the former. A number of shingle supply phases are distinguished beginning with the Late Devensian deglaciation. Shingle was carried by proglacial streams and later by rivers and deposited in the coastal and offshore zones. It was reworked by marine and river action, particularly during the high sea-level phase of the Flandrian Transgression, and deposited along the coast in the form of shingle bars and river terraces. The use of sediment parameters, along with morphological and stratigraphical evidence, could be applied to other areas to ascertain sediment sources and patterns of supply.

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