Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Demographic Transition Theory: A Neglected Aspect of the Nomadism-Sedentarism Continuum

Avinoam Meir
Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers
Vol. 11, No. 2 (1986), pp. 199-211
DOI: 10.2307/622006
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/622006
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Demographic Transition Theory: A Neglected Aspect of the Nomadism-Sedentarism Continuum
Preview not available

Abstract

Many nomadic societies in Third World countries are becoming sedentary. The associated changes in mode of production result in a social transformation that may carry significant demographic consequences. An adaptation of demographic transition theory to the nomadism-sedentarism continuum is proposed by treating demographic change as transition between demographic regimes associated with specific modes of production and suggesting that fertility increases and later declines, and mortality decreases along the continuum. Rising fertility during sedentarization is assumed to be a consequence of both social modernization and economic growth, which complement conventional theoretical statements. Data from several countries, along with a case study from Israel, suggest that birth rates do increase along the continuum but their decline at post-sedentarization, although possible, will depend on trends in the general rural sector. In several cases, mortality rates of sedentarizing nomads have been found to be higher than for nomads, suggesting deficient public health measures. Nevertheless, natural increase rates of sedentarizing nomads are considerably higher than those of pastoral nomads. This adaptation may help to achieve the goals of filling a gap in demographic transition theory and providing a conceptual framework for future research of more detailed and specific case studies.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
199
    199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
200
    200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206
  • Thumbnail: Page 
207
    207
  • Thumbnail: Page 
208
    208
  • Thumbnail: Page 
209
    209
  • Thumbnail: Page 
210
    210
  • Thumbnail: Page 
211
    211