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The Distribution of Store Sheep from Markets in Scotland

W. J. Carlyle
Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers
Vol. 3, No. 2 (1978), pp. 226-245
DOI: 10.2307/622203
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/622203
Page Count: 20
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The Distribution of Store Sheep from Markets in Scotland
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Abstract

Variations in distances store sheep are moved from livestock markets in Scotland to farms are the result mainly of the locations of markets, and the breeds and types of sheep sold. There is, however, little correlation between the total number of sheep sold at markets and the distance they are distributed. Highland markets are in areas of self-contained breeding flocks and little surplus feed. Stores sold at them are moved considerable distances to upland and lowland areas where the demand for sheep for cross-breeding and for feeding exceeds supplies at nearby markets, most of which distribute only locally. Cheviot and Half-Bred sheep are moved further from markets to farms than Blackface, Greyface, and Down-Cross sheep, and therefore markets at which Cheviots and Half-Breds make up the bulk of the turnover have larger distribution areas. For each breed, sheep for breeding are transferred somewhat longer distances than sheep for feeding, and this gives a wider influence to markets specializing in breeding sheep. These factors combined largely explain why the markets fall into five distinct categories when grouped according to the average distance sheep are moved from them to farms.

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