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Interferon Action II. Membrane-Bound Alkaline Ribonuclease Activity in Chick Embryo Cells Manifesting Interferon-Mediated Interference

Philip I. Marcus, Thomas M. Terry and Seymour Levine
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 72, No. 1 (Jan., 1975), pp. 182-186
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/64301
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Interferon Action II. Membrane-Bound Alkaline Ribonuclease Activity in Chick Embryo Cells Manifesting Interferon-Mediated Interference
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Abstract

Membrane fractions from chick embryo cells manifesting viral interference mediated by interferon or poly(I)· poly(C) contain high levels of an alkaline ribonuclease. Enhanced RNase activity is not observed when inhibitors of cell protein or RNA synthesis are present during interferon treatment, or when heterologous interferon is used. The RNase associated with comparable membrane fractions from cells treated with mock-interferon is about 1/10 as active, and shows qualitative differences. In principle, divergent views of interferon action may be reconciled to a common mode of action by postulating that viral interference results from a newly induced or activated RNase of cellular origin and proper specificity that acts to reduce the accumulation and functional capacity of newly synthesized viral RNAs, particularly mRNA. Previous data in support of interferon's acting to inhibit virion-derived transcription in vivo are now interpreted as demonstrating enhanced degradation of viral transcripts (mRNA).

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