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"Susto" Revisited: Illness as Strategic Role

Douglas Uzzell
American Ethnologist
Vol. 1, No. 2 (May, 1974), pp. 369-378
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Anthropological Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/643555
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
"Susto" Revisited: Illness as Strategic Role
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Abstract

Several studies have suggested that susto is a response to some kinds of social situations. Now it is possible to consider what susto offers as a strategic role. First, adult susto is distinguished from the disease suffered by children, because although children play the role, they do not name it: adults diagnose the illness in children and give it meaning. Concluding a discussion of the strategic advantages and disadvantages of both adult and childhood susto, it is proposed that we eventually must attend how the role evolves from personal fiction into reality.

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