Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Chief of the Chambri: Social Change and Cultural Permeability among a New Guinea People

Frederick Errington and Deborah Gewertz
American Ethnologist
Vol. 12, No. 3 (Aug., 1985), pp. 442-454
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Anthropological Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/644531
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Chief of the Chambri: Social Change and Cultural Permeability among a New Guinea People
Preview not available

Abstract

Facing an environmental crisis wrought by the introduction of a South American aquatic fern, the Chambri of the East Sepik province of Papua New Guinea have created a new social status, a "chief." In our explanation of the significance of this political innovation, we suggest that the arrival of the Europeans altered the Chambri understanding of the inherent restrictions in human life. The presence of the Europeans provided the Chambri with what they regarded as not only the solution to their immediate environmental crisis but to their basic cosmological contradiction, that between intensity of power and density of social life. [New Guinea, cultural change, political anthropology]

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
442
    442
  • Thumbnail: Page 
443
    443
  • Thumbnail: Page 
444
    444
  • Thumbnail: Page 
445
    445
  • Thumbnail: Page 
446
    446
  • Thumbnail: Page 
447
    447
  • Thumbnail: Page 
448
    448
  • Thumbnail: Page 
449
    449
  • Thumbnail: Page 
450
    450
  • Thumbnail: Page 
451
    451
  • Thumbnail: Page 
452
    452
  • Thumbnail: Page 
453
    453
  • Thumbnail: Page 
454
    454