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Islamic Clinics in Egypt: The Cultural Elaboration of Biomedical Hegemony

Soheir A. Morsy
Medical Anthropology Quarterly
New Series, Vol. 2, No. 4, Gramsci, Marxism and Phenomenology: Essays for the Development of Critical Medical Anthropology (Dec., 1988), pp. 355-369
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Anthropological Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/648939
Page Count: 15
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Islamic Clinics in Egypt: The Cultural Elaboration of Biomedical Hegemony
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Abstract

This article examines the provision of health care by Islamic voluntary organizations in Egypt. It links the development of Islamic clinics to national, regional, and international political-economic transformations of the past decade. The Islamization of medicine is revealed as a particular manifestation of the worldwide spread of biomedicine and not as a revival of earlier Islamic medical traditions. Far from representing an alternative health care strategy that challenges state authority, Islamist medicine is considered as a vehicle for power sharing.

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