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An Overview of the Phenomenon of Mixed Racial Isolates in the United States

Calvin L. Beale
American Anthropologist
New Series, Vol. 74, No. 3 (Jun., 1972), pp. 704-710
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Anthropological Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/671547
Page Count: 7
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An Overview of the Phenomenon of Mixed Racial Isolates in the United States
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Abstract

The subject of the paper is population groups of real or alleged tri-racial origin - Indian, White, and Negro. There is a review of the emergence of such groups in American history, their conflicts with public authorities, and their recognition by researchers. The past importance of separate schools as a boundary maintenance mechanism is discussed, with emphasis on the declining persistence of such schools today. The role of the church as the typical remaining group institution is noted.

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