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Defective Organization of Actin in Cultured Skin Fibroblasts from Patients with Inherited Adenocarcinoma

Levy Kopelovich, Susan Conlon and Robert Pollack
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 74, No. 7 (Jul., 1977), pp. 3019-3022
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/67295
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Defective Organization of Actin in Cultured Skin Fibroblasts from Patients with Inherited Adenocarcinoma
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Abstract

In the cytoplasm of well-spread cultured normal fibroblasts, actin is organized into a network of cables that run the length of the cell just inside the adherent cell membrane. A diffuse matrix replaces the cables in fibroblasts that have become tumorigenic as a result of oncogenic transformation. We have found a similar disruption in actin organization in cultured skin fibroblasts (passage 6-10) obtained by biopsy from patients with the inherited colonic cancer, adenomatosis of the colon and rectum (ACR). Because ACR is inherited as an auto-somal dominant trait, about half the children of ACR patients will develop colon cancer, but they typically remain asymptomatic until at least the second decade of life. Actin distribution within cultured cells from children of ACR patients was identical either to that seen in cultured cells from normal persons or to that seen in cultured cells from ACR patients. The two different patterns were independent of age, sex, drug treatment, or infections of the donors. Apparently, this class of colonic carcinoma is accompanied by a systemic aberration in the organization of fibroblast cytoplasm, and this aberration can be detected by immunofluorescent localization of actin within cultured skin fibroblasts, prior to manifestation of any colonic symptoms.

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