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The Individuation of Tradition in a Papua New Guinean Modernity

Frederick Errington and Deborah Gewertz
American Anthropologist
New Series, Vol. 98, No. 1 (Mar., 1996), pp. 114-126
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Anthropological Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/682957
Page Count: 13
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The Individuation of Tradition in a Papua New Guinean Modernity
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Abstract

This essay examines changing ideas about "culture" among the Chambri of Papua New Guinea. It focuses on a transnational company's promotion of Papua New Guinean culture in national advertising and on a Chambri politician's diatribe against youth for "prostituting" their local culture. Whereas some anthropologists see culture as an inalienable resource invoked by indigenous peoples to resist "modernity," the Chambri case suggests that "traditional" ideas of culture can be subtly reconfigured to support exogenous interests.

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