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Detection of an Early Surface Change during Oncogenic Transformation

Gordon Parry and Susan P. Hawkes
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 75, No. 8 (Aug., 1978), pp. 3703-3707
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/68750
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Detection of an Early Surface Change during Oncogenic Transformation
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Abstract

Fluorescamine, which can label surface components of cells grown as monolayers in culture, has been used to probe alterations in chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with a temperature-sensitive mutant of Rous sarcoma virus, Prague A, LA24. The fluorescence of bound fluorescamine on cells at the permissive temperature (35 degrees) was found to be about 1/3 that of cells cultured at the nonpermissive temperature (41 degrees). During development of the transformed phenotype, i.e., after transfer of the cells from 41 degrees to 35 degrees, the decrease in surface fluorescence was observed to be an early event, occurring within the first 4-8 hr after temperature shift. This alteration took place on a time scale similar to that of changes in 2-deoxyglucose transport and an increased rate of DNA synthesis, but before any major morphological changes. The change was related to cell transformation rather than to growth differences of the cells at the two temperatures. Further, it was found that fluorescamine was not monitoring the loss of LETS glycoprotein from the surface or the loss of any other surface components that could be detected by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination of surface proteins. When fluorescamine-labeled components were resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, significant differences were seen between components from cells cultured at 35 degrees compared with those from cells cultured at 41 degrees. Based on these results, possible mechanisms accounting for the fluorescence differences are suggested.

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