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Detection of a Transformation-Related Antigen in Chemically Induced Sarcomas and other Transformed Cells of the Mouse

Albert B. DeLeo, Gilbert Jay, Ettore Appella, Garrett C. Dubois, Lloyd W. Law and Lloyd J. Old
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 76, No. 5 (May, 1979), pp. 2420-2424
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/69399
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Detection of a Transformation-Related Antigen in Chemically Induced Sarcomas and other Transformed Cells of the Mouse
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Abstract

Antisera prepared against BALB/c Meth A sarcoma in syngeneic or compatible F1 mice recognize a protein with an apparent molecular weight of 53,000 in extracts of [35S]methionine-labeled transformed BALB/c cells. This component, designated p53, was not detected in normal adult mouse fibroblasts, lymphoid cells, or hematopoietic cells or in mouse embryo cells or 3T3 cells. An extensive variety of antisera, including alloantisera and heterologous antisera directed against structural antigens of murine leukemia viruses, was tested for reactivity with p53; other than Meth A antisera, only comparably prepared antisera against another BALB/c sarcoma, CMS4, had anti-p53 activity. All transformed mouse cells tested were found to express p53; these tests included chemically induced sarcomas, leukemias, spontaneously transformed fibroblasts, and cells transformed by simian virus 40 and murine sarcoma virus. The presence of p53 in tumors of no known viral etiology indicates coding by resident cellular genes; this does not exclude endogenous viruses as the source of coding sequences or the possibility that transforming viruses code directly for p53.

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