Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Primary γ -Rays [and Discussion]

C. E. Fichtel, T. Gold, J. L. Osborne and F. G. Smith
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Vol. 277, No. 1270, A Discussion on the Origin of the Cosmic Radiation (Jan. 23, 1975), pp. 365-379
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/74487
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Primary γ -Rays [and Discussion]
Preview not available

Abstract

Within our Galaxy, cosmic rays can reveal their presence in interstellar space and probably in source regions by their interactions with interstellar matter which lead to γ -rays with a very characteristic energy spectrum. From the study of the intensity of the high energy γ radiation as a function of galactic longitude, it is already clear that cosmic rays are almost certainly not uniformly distributed in the Galaxy and are not concentrated in the centre of the Galaxy. The galactic cosmic rays appear to be tied to galactic structural features, presumably by the galactic magnetic fields which are in turn held by the matter in the arm segments and the clouds. On the extra-galactic scale, it is now possible to say that cosmic rays are probably not at the density seen near the Earth. The diffuse celestial γ -ray spectrum that is observed presents the interesting possibility of cosmological studies and possible evidence for a residual universal cosmic-ray density, which is much lower than the present galactic cosmic-ray density.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
365
    365
  • Thumbnail: Page 
366
    366
  • Thumbnail: Page 
367
    367
  • Thumbnail: Page 
368
    368
  • Thumbnail: Page 
369
    369
  • Thumbnail: Page 
370
    370
  • Thumbnail: Page 
371
    371
  • Thumbnail: Page 
372
    372
  • Thumbnail: Page 
373
    373
  • Thumbnail: Page 
374
    374
  • Thumbnail: Page 
375
    375
  • Thumbnail: Page 
376
    376
  • Thumbnail: Page 
377
    377
  • Thumbnail: Page 
378
    378
  • Thumbnail: Page 
379
    379