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The Effects of Teaching Euclidean Geometry via Transformations on Student Achievement and Attitudes in Tenth-Grade Geometry

Zalman P. Usiskin
Journal for Research in Mathematics Education
Vol. 3, No. 4 (Nov., 1972), pp. 249-259
DOI: 10.2307/748492
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/748492
Page Count: 11
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The Effects of Teaching Euclidean Geometry via Transformations on Student Achievement and Attitudes in Tenth-Grade Geometry
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Abstract

Materials were written for an entire year's course in geometry in which transformations were used to develop the concepts of congruence, similarity, and symmetry, as well as being a vehicle for proof. This paper presents a study involving 413 students using these materials and 483 control students, comparing performance on standard geometry content and attitudes. Preliminary studies were done on perceptual, arithmetic, and algebraic skills. Student comprehension of transformation-related concepts, the problem of implementation, and attitudes of teachers were informally studied. While the data indicated that the experimental Ss could learn the material, few differences were detected with the measures employed--a significant difference ($p<.01$) in favor of the C group was found on the posttest of standard geometry content. Pre- (September) and posttest (June) student attitude data indicated a change in mean score, less positive, for both E and C groups ($p<.01$ for the C group). Attitude differences between E and C were not significant. Informal feedback from a teacher questionnaire indicated a favorable reaction to the experimental materials.

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