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The Influence of Instructional Aids on Mathematics Achievement

Dennis Raphael and Merlin Wahlstrom
Journal for Research in Mathematics Education
Vol. 20, No. 2 (Mar., 1989), pp. 173-190
DOI: 10.2307/749281
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/749281
Page Count: 18
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Influence of Instructional Aids on Mathematics Achievement
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Abstract

Data from the Second International Mathematics Study were analyzed using dual scaling or correspondence analysis to identify dimensions on which 103 Ontario Grade 8 mathematics teachers varied in reported use of instructional aids. These dimensions were then related to teacher and student characteristics and student achievement in mathematics. Teachers reporting greater use of a variety of instructional aids in the teaching of geometry and of ratio, proportion, and percent also reported greater course coverage. Experienced teachers reported more use of instructional aids. Student achievement in geometry was related to teaching experience and occasional use of a variety of instructional aids. Student achievement in ratio, proportion, and percent was related to teaching experience but was associated with extensive rather than occasional use of aids. The effect of instructional aids did not remain after the influence of topic coverage was removed. The use of instructional aids in the teaching of measurement was unrelated to virtually all teacher and student characteristics as well as student achievement.

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