Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Effect of the Environment on Processing and Handling Materials at Sea [and Discussion]

T. H. Hughes and B. White
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Vol. 290, No. 1366, Sea Floor Development: Moving into Deep Water (Aug. 21, 1978), pp. 161-177
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/75079
Page Count: 21
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effect of the Environment on Processing and Handling Materials at Sea [and Discussion]
Preview not available

Abstract

Compared with conventional land-based mining and processing operations, the exploitation of minerals from the seabed, particularly in deep water, involves a vast range of new problems in conducting the various stages of mining, transportation, processing and disposal of waste products, in a marine environment. In all such operations the ways in which local sea and weather conditions and their seasonal variations affect the stability of the vehicle, be it ship or other floating structure or submersible from which the operations are being conducted, have to be taken into account. The resulting motion together with vibration generated by propulsion and other machinery are significant factors in the performance and behaviour of equipment and materials during processing, handling and transportation operations at sea. In deep-sea mining operations at depths of 2-5 km the effects of associated pressure, salinity and temperature must also be dealt with. The paper reviews the present state of such knowledge as currently practised in continental-shelf operations, and as proposed in various deep-sea mining operations. Associated research requirements for future mineral exploitation in the deep-sea environment are discussed.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162
  • Thumbnail: Page 
163
    163
  • Thumbnail: Page 
164
    164
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
165
    165
  • Thumbnail: Page 
166
    166
  • Thumbnail: Page 
167
    167
  • Thumbnail: Page 
168
    168
  • Thumbnail: Page 
169
    169
  • Thumbnail: Page 
170
    170
  • Thumbnail: Page 
171
    171
  • Thumbnail: Page 
172
    172
  • Thumbnail: Page 
173
    173
  • Thumbnail: Page 
174
    174
  • Thumbnail: Page 
175
    175
  • Thumbnail: Page 
176
    176
  • Thumbnail: Page 
177
    177