Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Der Exodyszyklus der Sarajevo-Haggada: Bemerkungen zur Arbeitsweise spätmittelalterlicher jüdischer Illuminatoren und ihrem Umgang mit Vorlagen

Katrin Kogman-Appel
Gesta
Vol. 35, No. 2 (1996), pp. 111-127
DOI: 10.2307/767176
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/767176
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Der Exodyszyklus der Sarajevo-Haggada: Bemerkungen zur Arbeitsweise spätmittelalterlicher jüdischer Illuminatoren und ihrem Umgang mit Vorlagen
Preview not available

Abstract

This article searches out the iconographic models of the Sarajevo Haggadah. One of the purposes of this search is to contribute a few observations to the recently much-debated question of recensions. It appears that the iconographic models of the Sarajevo-Haggadah are of specifically western character and in many cases hark back to late antique sources. These sources are manifold and originate from different iconographic traditions, but they also point clearly to the phenomenon of transmission of iconographic types and formulae from earlier sources, such as an early Christian Pentateuch. Therefore, it seems that the Haggadah's illuminator combined a variety of available sources in order to create a distinctive cycle with very specific characteristics. To this extent the article reinforces methods developed in the search for recensions. On the other hand, it has been believed that the whole group of sephardic cycles goes back to a common Jewish prototype. The following article challenges this assumption and shows that it is more likely that the Jewish illuminators used a variety of Christian models which they modified according to their specific needs. The article concentrates on the question of how medieval illuminators made use of models and how free they were to modify, to combine, and to enrich them.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
120
    120
  • Thumbnail: Page 
121
    121
  • Thumbnail: Page 
122
    122
  • Thumbnail: Page 
123
    123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
124
    124
  • Thumbnail: Page 
125
    125
  • Thumbnail: Page 
126
    126
  • Thumbnail: Page 
127
    127