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Some Compositional Characteristics of Georgian Triptychs of the Thirteenth through Fifteenth Centuries

Nina Chichinadze
Gesta
Vol. 35, No. 1 (1996), pp. 66-76
DOI: 10.2307/767227
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/767227
Page Count: 11
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Abstract

Triptychs constitute a special group within the class of painted icons from the Middle Ages. They are distinguished by their form, structure, and compositional system. Their themes and iconography have a particular character. The compositional characteristics of triptychs are especially interesting because the complicated form of the triptychs with their multiple surfaces challenged their artists to coordinate numerous scenes and figures. Medieval Georgian triptychs fill lacunae in the history of icon painting. The Georgian material demonstrates the diversity of the compositional and iconographic systems of such icons. What is more, almost all of the Georgian triptychs preserve their donor inscriptions, and these give us precious information about their patrons, provenance, and function.

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