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A Fifteenth-Century Stained-Glass Entombment in Cleveland and the St. Cecilia Workshop in Cologne

Helen Zakin
Gesta
Vol. 37, No. 2, Essays on Stained Glass in Memory of Jane Hayward (1918-1994) (1998), pp. 266-271
DOI: 10.2307/767269
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/767269
Page Count: 6
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A Fifteenth-Century Stained-Glass Entombment in Cleveland and the St. Cecilia Workshop in Cologne
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Abstract

A window illustrating the Entombment that dates to the beginning of the fourth quarter of the fifteenth century is now in Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, Cleveland, Ohio. It is one member of a large series scattered in collections in the United States, Great Britain, and Germany. The pieces installed in the Sacraments Chapel of Cologne cathedral are said to have come from the abbey of St. Cecilia, Cologne. All were made by the St. Cecilia workshop. The members of this workshop painted in two different styles. The first style is that of the Nativity panels in the Sacraments Chapel, and the second is that of the Passion panels in the same chapel. The Entombment in Cleveland and its variants in the Sacraments Chapel and at Great Bookham, Surrey, were produced during the second phase of the development of the St. Cecilia workshop, to which the Passion series belongs. Although each is slightly different, all three Entombments derive from one design. Copies of one full-scale pattern were used to make the variants. The Cologne version is probably the earliest. Elisabeth von Witzleben and Herbert Rode connected the Entombment in Cleveland and the Entombment in the Sacraments Chapel to the Master of the Life of Mary, but that master's wooden panel painting of the Entombment is unlike all three stainedglass panels. Indeed, a broad appraisal of the other wooden panels painted by the Master of the Life of Mary indicates that his work is conceptually very different from that of the Passion windows produced by the St. Cecilia workshop.

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