Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Psalter Illustration in the Très Riches Heures of Jean de Berry

Margaret M. Manion
Gesta
Vol. 34, No. 2 (1995), pp. 147-161
DOI: 10.2307/767285
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/767285
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Psalter Illustration in the Très Riches Heures of Jean de Berry
Preview not available

Abstract

This article draws attention to a hitherto neglected aspect of the Très Riches Heures of Jean de Berry (ca. 1411-1416), namely an unusual series of small miniatures which illustrate the psalms and canticles of the book's various Offices and devotions. Instead of referring to the theme of a particular Office, as is customary for illustrations in books of hours, these miniatures, following an old tradition of psalter illustration, focus attention on certain words or verses of individual psalms, and were originally designed to be accompanied by explanatory tituli. It is argued that the purpose of these labelled images was to enable the Duke to select individual psalms or canticles for prayer as if from a psalter. Analysis of this imagery also demonstrates how attention was focussed on fundamental Christian truths through typology, christological interpretation and liturgical association. By contrast to the small group of fully illustrated late medieval psalters that employ the literal or allegorical "word picture" method, the psalm miniatures in the Très Riches Heures avoid obscure interpretations; the series provides an interesting example of the skilful linking of words and images for the purposes of instruction and affective devotion, that is characteristic of prayer-books produced for members of the French royal family throughout the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161