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Journal Article

The Equation of State of Materials Intermediate to Rubbers and Glasses

S. F. Edwards and W. H. Stockmayer
Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Vol. 332, No. 1591 (Apr. 3, 1973), pp. 439-442
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/78275
Page Count: 4

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Topics: Equations of state, Rubber, Materials, Glass, Polymer chemistry, Deformation
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The Equation of State of Materials Intermediate to Rubbers and Glasses
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Abstract

Polymerized materials exist in which the molecules have a small amount of freedom of movement about a basic structure which is a random flight. The fixed basic structure is characteristic of a glass, but the degrees of freedom give the material rubbery properties. Using the Gaussian chain model, suitably generalized, we calculate the equation of state. Not only is this interesting as describing these materials, but it also throws light on general forms of the equation of state which have been proposed. It does not have any of the forms quoted in the literature since it contains terms linear in the deformation. In terms of a single relative length λ and incompressible material, the classical form (λ -λ -2) is diminished by a term (1-λ -3/2).

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