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The Rheology of Oils During Impact. III. Elastic Behaviour

W. Hirst and M. G. Lewis
Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Vol. 334, No. 1596 (Jul. 17, 1973), pp. 1-18
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/78300
Page Count: 18
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The Rheology of Oils During Impact. III. Elastic Behaviour
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Abstract

It was shown in two earlier papers that the behaviour of many mineral oils and silicone fluids in impact agrees with theory when the effects of temperature are properly taken into account. The behaviour of some fluids of high viscosity could not be explained and these fluids appeared to possess elastic properties. It is shown that the effects observed earlier can be reproduced using polymer solutions. By varying the strength of the solution and the initial film thickness a range of effects can be seen and the observed phenomena comprise a systematic pattern. It has been found that under all but the most extreme conditions the elastic behaviour is the result of the compression of the film; elastic behaviour in shear is seldom observed. Elastic effects are exhibited by all fluids in the appropriate conditions and criteria are given for the detection of both shear and compressive elastic effects in the presence of viscous flow. The theory of the impact of compressible fluids has been developed and shown to agree with experiment. It explains the behaviour of the fluids which had previously been thought to be anomalous. In addition, it predicts that the pressure distribution differs greatly from that in viscous conditions and changes with time. This prediction has been confirmed by direct experimental measurement.

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