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The Making of the Black Middle Class

Sharon M. Collins
Social Problems
Vol. 30, No. 4 (Apr., 1983), pp. 369-382
DOI: 10.2307/800108
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/800108
Page Count: 14
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The Making of the Black Middle Class
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Abstract

Race no longer appears to be a barrier to the quest of some U. S. blacks for middle-class position. However, is black middle-class advancement as stable as it appears? This paper looks at several factors creating job opportunities for blacks since 1960. I find that black mobility does not reflect a decrease in racial discrimination. On the contrary, black progress in the 1960s and 1970s marks the onset of a new system of segregation. Racial discrimination has softened within income and occupational distributions and recongealed in the structure of job opportunities. I argue, therefore, that the black middle class occupies a fragile market position.

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