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"Going Monoclonal": Art, Science, and Magic in the Day-to-Day Use of Hybridoma Technology

Alberto Cambrosio and Peter Keating
Social Problems
Vol. 35, No. 3, Special Issue: The Sociology of Science and Technology (Jun., 1988), pp. 244-260
DOI: 10.2307/800621
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/800621
Page Count: 17
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"Going Monoclonal": Art, Science, and Magic in the Day-to-Day Use of Hybridoma Technology
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Abstract

Recent work in the sociology of science has highlighted the local and tacit dimensions of scientific work. Against the widely held assumption that we are here dealing with a form of knowledge largely beyond the control and manipulation of scientists, we will argue that the unsaid is indeed a part of conscious scientific practice--and hence subject to negotiation, discussion, and construction. Based on a study of the transmission of hybridoma technology, this paper will show that questions of local knowledge, tacit knowledge, and "magic," far from being ignored by scientific researchers, are explicitly a part of their daily practice. It will be seen that these questions give rise to a series of social and technical distinctions which are constitutive of scientific work.

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