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Presumptive Common Precursor for Neuronal and Glial Cell Lineages in Mouse Hypothalamus

F. De Vitry, R. Picart, C. Jacque, L. Legault, P. Dupouey and A. Tixier-Vidal
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 77, No. 7, [Part 2: Biological Sciences] (Jul., 1980), pp. 4165-4169
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/9057
Page Count: 5
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Presumptive Common Precursor for Neuronal and Glial Cell Lineages in Mouse Hypothalamus
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Abstract

The cellular localization of a neuronal and a glial cell specific protein (14-3-2 and S-100, respectively) has been explored in mouse hypothalamus in order to trace cell lineages. This study was performed on fixed slices, at the light microscope level, by using either the indirect peroxidase-labeled immunoglobulin technique or immunofluorescence. In the adult, only S-100 immunoreactivity was found in the ependymal layer. In contrast, the magnocellular neurons of the preoptic area displayed strong 14-3-2 immunoreactivity. At neonatal stages (fetal day 17-postnatal day 3), both 14-3-2 and S-100 immunoreactivities developed simultaneously in the same cells lining the ventral part of the third ventricle. Transient detachment of some of these ventricular cells could be visualized before migration in the hypothalamus where they remained as bipotential cells up to postnatal day 10. Later in the development, they differentiated into separate cells, one type containing 14-3-2 and the other S-100, like neurons and glial cells. These results argue for a developmental stage during which cells lining the ventricle are bipotential and may thus be candidates for the role of stem cells for both neuronal and glial lineages.

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