Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A Study of the Branched Cells of the Mammalian Epidermis with Special Reference to the Fate of their Division Products

R. E. Billingham and P. B. Medawar
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Vol. 237, No. 644 (Mar. 10, 1953), pp. 151-170
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/92438
Page Count: 25
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Study of the Branched Cells of the Mammalian Epidermis with Special Reference to the Fate of their Division Products
Preview not available

Abstract

The branched cells of the superficial epidermis of mammals are divisible into two classes: those that occupy a position in the basal layer, and those that occur in more superficial layers. The first class comprises melanocytes visible in the living epidermis after its enzymatic fission from the corium; cells that blacken upon exposure to dihydroxyphenylalanine; cells that maintain quinoneimine dyes in the oxidized state in living skin; and clear cells. It is shown that these are merely different preparation images of the same cell, the melanocyte. The second class comprises cells that may be more or less specifically impregnated by metallic gold (Langerhans' cells); cells stainable in living skin by quinone-imine dyes; and the 'clear cells' of superficial strata. It is shown that these, too, are so many preparation images of the same cell. It is argued that the branched cells of superficial strata, which have never been seen to divide, represent effete melanocytes which, having discharged or otherwise lost their pigment, participate in the general outward movement of epidermal cells to be cast off at the skin surface. This argument is supported by evidence of their similarity of structure, mode of branching, and relationship to neighbouring Malpighian cells; by their position in the epidermis; by their one-to-one correspondence of number; and by their coincidence of distribution.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162
  • Thumbnail: Page 
163
    163
  • Thumbnail: Page 
164
    164
  • Thumbnail: Page 
165
    165
  • Thumbnail: Page 
166
    166
  • Thumbnail: Page 
167
    167
  • Thumbnail: Page 
168
    168
  • Thumbnail: Page 
169
    169
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]