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"Pour le rondeau en forme mettre...": Mon confesseur, rondeau de Clément Janequin

Jean-Pierre Ouvrard
Revue de Musicologie
T. 64, No. 2 (1978), pp. 203-228
DOI: 10.2307/928236
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/928236
Page Count: 27
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"Pour le rondeau en forme mettre...": Mon confesseur, rondeau de Clément Janequin
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Abstract

All of Clement Janequin's polyphonic songs are available in a complete edition of his work which was published some ten years ago. It would seem, however, that the exact form of one of these songs (Mon confesseur) escaped the attention of the editors. Nevertheless, as all of the song's elements appear in Attaingnant's Trente et une chansons musicales (1534), it can be reconstructed according to the prosodic grill of the rondeau. Although it was one of the more archaic forms in the repertory of 16th century parisian songs, the rondeau had not totally disappeared from the poetic habits of the period, and the interpretation of the text as a "double rondeau" gives a complete and authentic version of this song (cf. annex). This reconstitution can be confirmed, if necessary, by literary concordances found in four song books without music (1535, 1537, 1538, 1543) which are posterior to the musical source. Thus reconstructed, this song reveals itself to be one of the rare examples of whole rondeaus set to music in the 16th century. Some other examples are Janequin's En escoutant, the anonymous Just et amer, Loys Bourgeois' Ce moys de may (for the latter two songs cf. annex), and Certon's On le m'a dict. As most of the musical publications of this time furnish incomplete rondeaus in diverse forms -- "quatrains ", "cinquains", "sixains", "huitains" (stanzas of four, five, six and eight lines) -- this song is an important addition to a field which has yet to be fully explored: music written for rondeaus in the 16th century.

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