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Inka-Style Ceramics and Their Chronological Relationship to the Inka Expansion in the Southern Lake Titicaca Area (Bolivia)

Martti Pärssinen and Ari Siiriäinen
Latin American Antiquity
Vol. 8, No. 3 (Sep., 1997), pp. 255-271
DOI: 10.2307/971655
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/971655
Page Count: 17
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Inka-Style Ceramics and Their Chronological Relationship to the Inka Expansion in the Southern Lake Titicaca Area (Bolivia)
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Abstract

[English] In this article the widely accepted proposition of a direct correlation between the historically attested Inka expansion during the fifteenth century and the archaeologically recorded appearance of Inka-style ceramics is tested. Excavation of an Inka-type house in Caquiaviri, once a provincial capital of the Inka state in the southern Lake Titicaca area, revealed a stratigraphic sequence with both typical Inka pottery and local ceramics. Radiocarbon dates show that the lowermost strata accumulated before the middle of the fifteenth century, when Inka ceramics were already in use. This, together with several other radiocarbon dates from northern Chile, demonstrates that the archaeologically observed ceramic period does not correlate with the historically recorded conquest. // [Spanish] En este artículo se prueba la propuesta ampliamente aceptada de la directa correlación entre la expansión incaica del siglo XV mencionada en las fuentes históricas y la aparición del estilo cerámico inca en el registro arqueológico. La excavación de una casa inca típica en Caquiaviri (una capital provincial incaica, en el área meridional del Lago Titicaca) reveló una secuencia estratigráfica de cerámica incaica y alfarería local. Las fechas radiocarbónicas muestran que los estratos inferiores se acumularon antes de la mitad del siglo XV, cuando la cerámica incaica ya estaba en uso. Esto, junto con otros fechamientos radiocarbónicos del norte de Chile, demuestra que la fase cerámica del registro arqueológico no concuerda con la conquista mencionada en las fuentes escritas.

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