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Hypotheses on Administrative Selection

Milton M. Mandell
Public Administration Review
Vol. 19, No. 1 (Winter, 1959), pp. 12-18
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public Administration
DOI: 10.2307/973854
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/973854
Page Count: 7
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Hypotheses on Administrative Selection
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Abstract

Though knowing better, administrators often subconsciously accept the personnel selection process as something mechanical, akin to inserting a program into a computer. The selection process for administrators is examined here in flesh and blood terms, as it relates to other aspects of administration as well as to filling specific jobs. We are reminded of the great deal we do not know about choosing administrators that we usually take for granted as known. If verified by observations of practitioners and studies of researchers, these hypotheses can provide firmer guides to personnel action and to the identification and proper placement of administrative talent.

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