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Do We Really Want to Consolidate Urban Police Forces? A Reappraisal of Some Old Assertions

Elinor Ostrom, Roger B. Parks and Gordon P. Whitaker
Public Administration Review
Vol. 33, No. 5 (Sep. - Oct., 1973), pp. 423-432
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public Administration
DOI: 10.2307/974306
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/974306
Page Count: 10
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Do We Really Want to Consolidate Urban Police Forces? A Reappraisal of Some Old Assertions
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Abstract

It is frequently assumed that large-scale police forces are necessary to enable departments to specialize and professionalize. It is also assumed that large-scale agencies are more efficient and thus able to produce the same or higher levels of output at lower costs than smaller departments. This study empirically examines these two basic assumptions in six neighborhoods within one metropolitan area. The findings do not support the basic assumptions made above and thus underline the importance of further empirical research related to the effect of size on the output of police agencies.

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