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Public Personnel Administration and the Constitution: An Emergent Approach

David H. Rosenbloom
Public Administration Review
Vol. 35, No. 1 (Jan. - Feb., 1975), pp. 52-59
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public Administration
DOI: 10.2307/975201
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/975201
Page Count: 8
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Public Personnel Administration and the Constitution: An Emergent Approach
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Abstract

An analysis of recent judicial decisicions concerning the procedural and substantive constitutional rights of public employees indicates that the courts have adopted an idiographic approach to many of the issues involved. This approach is of greatest importance with regard to procedural due process, freedom of speech, association, and thought, and equal protection. It has important implications for public personnel administration and requires modification of some practices associated with political neutrality, the establishment of moral standards for public employees, and the quest for greater efficiency. The idiographic approach also decreases the utility of public personnel administration's policing function in several respects.

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