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The Brownlow Committee Fifty Years Later

James W. Fesler
Public Administration Review
Vol. 47, No. 4 (Jul. - Aug., 1987), pp. 291-296
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public Administration
DOI: 10.2307/975308
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/975308
Page Count: 6
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The Brownlow Committee Fifty Years Later
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Abstract

This Brownlow Committee's place in history is misperceived by those who think that the Committee prescribed a comprehensive reorganization detailing reassignment of bureaus among the departments, that its accomplishments were limited to the Executive Office of the President, and that it fostered development of "the imperial presidency." It scanted the first. It established an ambitious agenda of reform much of which has been realized. It proposed a modest number of presidential assistants and defined their roles in terms that resonate 50 years later, the more so because their flouting has led to a hyperactive, inflated presidential entourage and has cost the Republic dearly.

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