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Structured Decision Making in Public Organizations

Julianne G. Mahler
Public Administration Review
Vol. 47, No. 4 (Jul. - Aug., 1987), pp. 336-342
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public Administration
DOI: 10.2307/975314
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/975314
Page Count: 7
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Structured Decision Making in Public Organizations
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Abstract

The Nominal Group Technique (NGT) and other structured decision-making methods are being used increasingly for public planning and decision making, in part because of claims that these methods offer more egalitarian participation than is found in conventional, interacting groups. Some questions exist, however, about group members' perceptions of their participation and their acceptance of the final choice. Case studies are analyzed, and an exercise with public administration students is reported here which suggests that perceived levels of participation are higher in interacting than in nominal groups. Assumptions about politics behind NGT and related methods are also explored.

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