If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Social Entrepreneurs and Catalytic Change

Sandra A. Waddock and James E. Post
Public Administration Review
Vol. 51, No. 5 (Sep. - Oct., 1991), pp. 393-401
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public Administration
DOI: 10.2307/976408
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/976408
Page Count: 9
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Social Entrepreneurs and Catalytic Change
Preview not available

Abstract

What is social entrepreneurship, and what is its role in the public domain? Professors Waddock and Post focus on the activities of two social entrepreneurs to answer those questions and to provide some insight into the conditions that contribute to their work. Social entrepreneurs are private sector citizens who play critical roles in bringing about "catalytic changes" in the public sector agenda and the perception of certain social issues. Although not involved in direct actions to solve public problems, their work sets the stage and context for policy making and policy implementation activities. Using the leaders of Partnership for a Drug-Free America and Hands Across America as examples, Waddock and Post highlight the situational factors that made their projects so successful, including problem complexity, credibility, and a commitment to collective purpose.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
393
    393
  • Thumbnail: Page 
394
    394
  • Thumbnail: Page 
395
    395
  • Thumbnail: Page 
396
    396
  • Thumbnail: Page 
397
    397
  • Thumbnail: Page 
398
    398
  • Thumbnail: Page 
399
    399
  • Thumbnail: Page 
400
    400
  • Thumbnail: Page 
401
    401