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U. S. Defense Spending under the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act, 1986-1989

Sung Deuk Hahm, Mark S. Kamlet and David C. Mowery
Public Administration Review
Vol. 52, No. 1 (Jan. - Feb., 1992), pp. 8-15
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public Administration
DOI: 10.2307/976541
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/976541
Page Count: 8
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U. S. Defense Spending under the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act, 1986-1989
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Abstract

How did the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act (GRH) impact on U. S. defense spending? Focusing on defense spending from 1986-1989, Sung Deuk Hahm, Mark Kamlet, and David Mowery found defense spending to be lower than it would have been without GRH. GRH partially, but not completely, returned defense spending priorities and defense-fiscal policy linkages to their pre-Reagan status. GRH restrained expenditures by a similar percentage in all of the functional defense categories except one-the politically sensitive areas of research, development, test and evaluation. This finding contrasts with previous studies that found the impacts to be uneven across functional spending categories.

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