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Women and Minorities in Federal Government Agencies: Examining New Evidence from Panel Data

Christopher Cornwell and J. Edward Kellough
Public Administration Review
Vol. 54, No. 3 (May - Jun., 1994), pp. 265-270
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public Administration
DOI: 10.2307/976730
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/976730
Page Count: 6
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Women and Minorities in Federal Government Agencies: Examining New Evidence from Panel Data
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Abstract

What accounts for differences among agencies in the percentage of jobs held by women and minorities and the growth rates in their employment shares? This article explores new evidence from panel data on the extent to which interagency differences in the employment of women and minorities are systematically related to the distribution of occupations within an agency and an agency's demographic and organizational characteristics. Some findings from earlier research are confirmed by this study, but there are also several important differences between results obtained in this analysis and those obtained earlier from standard cross-sectional approaches.

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