Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Women, Occupations, and Federal Agencies: Occupational Mix and Interagency Differences in Sexual Inequality in Federal White-Collar Employment

Gregory B. Lewis
Public Administration Review
Vol. 54, No. 3 (May - Jun., 1994), pp. 271-276
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public Administration
DOI: 10.2307/976731
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/976731
Page Count: 6
  • Download ($25.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Women, Occupations, and Federal Agencies: Occupational Mix and Interagency Differences in Sexual Inequality in Federal White-Collar Employment
Preview not available

Abstract

Does a federal agency's mission influence how female employees are used? Gregory Lewis notes that federal agencies differ markedly on a variety of measures. The variation appears to arise, he postulates, primarily from differences in agency tasks, as represented by the occupational breakdown of their work forces. Agencies whose missions require many employees in traditionally female occupations employ more women and more higher-level women than agencies whose missions tip toward traditionally male jobs. Simple cross-agency comparisons of the status of women, and excessive focus on women's share of total employment, give misleading pictures of agency efforts and success in promoting equality. He examines measures that take occupational mix into account, that assess men's and women's distributions across grades, and that gauge progress toward equality in an effort to more accurately test agencies' affirmative action efforts.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
271
    271
  • Thumbnail: Page 
272
    272
  • Thumbnail: Page 
273
    273
  • Thumbnail: Page 
274
    274
  • Thumbnail: Page 
275
    275
  • Thumbnail: Page 
276
    276