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The Fluctuating Fortunes of the United Nations International Civil Service: Hostage to Politics or Undeservedly Criticized?

Robert S. Jordan
Public Administration Review
Vol. 51, No. 4 (Jul. - Aug., 1991), pp. 353-357
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public Administration
DOI: 10.2307/976750
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/976750
Page Count: 5
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The Fluctuating Fortunes of the United Nations International Civil Service: Hostage to Politics or Undeservedly Criticized?
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Abstract

What is the status of the international civil service? Under ideal circumstances, those working for the United Nations bureaucracy would be politically neutral, recruited on the basis of merit, and subject to uniform standards regarding conditions of employment. But, as Robert S. Jordan points out in this commentary, the reality is quite different. The international civil service, like its national counterparts, is subject to the political conditions of its environment.

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